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Introduction - Page 5
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Thread: Introduction

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by one_man_bty
    Hi everyone,
    I'm a military medical student (but hopefully a military doctor in about 4 weeks :S) I'm training in the UK. My special interest is resuscitation of the critically ill patient and I'm always looking for new ways to do things, especially if they are applicable to my future career.
    So far I've seen some interesting stuff - Thanks!


    Welcome! It will be interesting to get your perspectives on military / field medicine from across the pond.
    ***************************************
    Emergency Medicine - saving the world from itself, one person at a time. Life guarding the shallow end of the gene pool. Your first stop on your last trip, and the backstop to all other medical specialites.

  2. #62
    HuntingWolf Guest
    Hello,
    I am trained as a MAA and I'm studying to be a MT. Some may know me from a few other forums.

    I hope tro learn a lot here! :wink:

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    denmark
    Posts
    218
    have not poste on the intro yet so here goes.
    i am a 5y medical studten from denmark, form EMT, flight medic on SAR helo. medic in bosiner and in iraq(04). tactical medicin instrutor in the danish army, for police sof and dortors, and also unit going to iraq and A-stand.

    all auster care has my intrest.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    239
    Main hobbies: Flying, hunting, skiing, informal target shooting.

    Short Version/CV type info: Physician (IM/geriatrics), 15 or so years on ski patrol (no longer able to do so due to liability concerns), ACLS instructor for 20 years, university assistant professor.

    I've only had one relief mission trip, and that was a number of years ago -- to Mexico in the aftermath of floods & mudslides.

    I look forward to getting to know people here, and hope to learn more, too.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    E. Coast
    Posts
    3,077
    Welcome doc!

    -t
    When discussing the shelf life of Twinkies, the limiting factor is the life of the shelf.

    If enough shit hits the fan, the blades stop rotating.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    4,708
    Hearty greetings indeed! Would be interested in your account of your relief experience.

    RR
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New Zealand.
    Posts
    49
    Many of you know me from you know where.

    Tangent, would you be able to grab my avatar from there and transport it to here for me? I can't figure out how.

    Okay, firstly, I'm a nothing.

    You could say however, that I'm a walking experiment in austere medicine. At the age of 20 became allergic to all antibiotics then, and the odd foray with newer ones has proven that future forays are a waste of time.

    I have an immunodeficiency and a thyroglossal cyst that regularly reminds me of how not to swallow stones. So the last 30 years have been a walking experiment in how to overcome infectious issues without the aid of a prescription pad, and how to try to shore up the existing superstructure with wiser use of foods and nutrients, but I have a long way to go.

    My only concessions to modern medicine with regard to infections is the use of drixine, otherwise I get earache that an elephant would object to.

    As a result, I've concentrated on nutrition, micronutrients, including selenium, as its a problem many ordinary people in the country I live in (with the exception of farmers), have no idea contributes to a lot of problems we have, but I also have looked at all the other minerals, and vitamins.

    My favourite medical texts relating to infection are actually a three volume text by CRC Press, by Professor Clemetson on "Vitamin C", which I think should be compulsory reading for all medics. There are other ones on vitamin C that are good, but Professor Clemetson being mainstream, has an approach that others don't.

    Old, but also significant is Dr Roger William's "Individual biochemical susceptibility" which is an issue easily forgotten, if you happen to be treated by someone with a sausage factory mentality.

    Re Vitamin C, Just a shame that equisetum isn't in this country But rosehips about by the million. Just a shame they taste so filthy

    I've also had to look at homeopathy, as for me, anything which might exceed placebo value is worth looking at, including Colloidal Silver, which I've found far exceeds placebo value for me.

    the other area which I've studied a lot, particularly from Russia Professor Nodar Kipshidze's work with the Tamysh started my search on the issue of probiotics, which has saved not only my bacon, but others. The Russians have done a huge amount of work on the role of probiotics in infectious diseases, and it WORKS and is something I'd like to see taken more seriously in the Western world.

    They've also done a lot of work on phages, which I think the Western world will have to get their head around sometime.

    I'm now in the process at looking more closely at herbals specific to this country, which isn't that easy... and looking at what "nothings" like me, can do in a TEOTWAWKI situation.

    No doubt I will rub some of you up the wrong way, and if so I apologise.

    I believe that vaccines are overused, and antibiotics grossly abused, and that many of the drugs prescribed are prescribed needlessly.

    I also feel that medical knowledge of nutrition is worse than abysmal and that in terms of TEOTWAWKI, we all need to be much more attuned to nutrition, herbs, and jury rig whatever else we can, than pharmaceutical medicine does at the moment.

    But I do want to pick doctor's brains here on the manual craft of bone-doctoring for civilians, and other stuff that non-medical people might be able to get their heads around.

    My other hobbies. Embroidery, knitting, survival crafts, gardening, and cooking, though I don't seem to get much time to do those things these days...

    That would be about the longest intro here...

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    E. Coast
    Posts
    3,077
    Welcome Just Wondering!,

    OMG! :-o: 5 posts and she's allready done it!!!!

    > Colloidal Silver...

    Quick! - everybody DUCK!!!! before RR gets over here w/ his flamethrower!

    I'll see what I can do on the avatar.

    I've never heard of probiotics or phages (this latter term rings bells from biology, but I'm guessing your talking about something else?), in any event, I'd be quite interested in hearing more about these areas - perhaps in the herbal and alternative therapies forum?

    Pull up a chair and join the discussion,

    -t
    When discussing the shelf life of Twinkies, the limiting factor is the life of the shelf.

    If enough shit hits the fan, the blades stop rotating.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    New Zealand.
    Posts
    49
    Well, I only mentioned it, becuase Craig said in one of his posts about it. From my point of view if I open the cupboard and the potential solutions are thin on top, then I'm going to consider it. I can't afford to have my eyes shut tight in my situation.

    But don't ask me to consider lead paint coz that's a no go.

    It's hard to know where to put either probiotics or phages.

    In Russian, both are mainstream first line medicine. There have been quite a few programmes on Discovery channel and also 60 minutes (or was it 20/20?) about what they are doing with phages. They are using cultured phages to eliminate bacteria instead of using antibiotics.

    Probiotics they use for a vast variety of complaints. Most of my technical information comes from Pubmed, but there are quite a few medical articles in BMJ and other places, where they are now looking at probiotics. Professor Kipshidze lives in Georgia now, and most of his information was anecdotal, except that he made it a study of his for about 20 years. But I've not been able to find it written up in anything English I can read. He's a real card though. Pretty phlegmatic. Had some very dry things to say about his oldest patient (169 years old) who basically died of old-age/boredom.

    Anyway, you tell me where to stick the probiotics stuff, and I'll put up some URL's to medical articles if people are interested...

    The thing is that the gut flora constitutes about 70% of the inate immune system's primary defences, and if you mess them up, the patient can be in more trouble than you know, particularly with antibiotics, so its important to know how to rectify that situation, and that's something the russians are great at.

    I have a friend who lives in Bishkek in Uzbekistan, and she has a pretty rare condition (MenI) so she had to get out of Bishkek recently for a while, to have treatment for it in Portland. But even though the medicine is third world in Bishkek, the one thing they did was put her on three different types of probiotics, and got her bowels moving properly for the first time in decades, and increased her ability to absorb food.


    Finding decent information for you on phages is more difficult, coz these are generally written up in Russian medical journals, and I'm not much cop reading russian.
    Last edited by Just Wondering; 09-19-05 at 05:49.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    southern indiana
    Posts
    2

    greetings

    Greetings to one and all. I am excited about the information that I'll obtain here at the forum. I am a 'jack of all trades' in the medical community. I work as a mental health counselor, mainly in addictions. I am also a EMT-A and do both for the county hospital that I work for. I am CISM trained and NOVA trained in dealing with trauma. I am an instructor for the National Cave Rescue Commission, an AHA CPR instructor, ham radio, swiftwater rescue technical, NASAR SAR Tech II, and an outdoor nut. I have two wonderful kids, who are the biggest blessing I could ever ask for and enjoy every moment with them.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    359
    Welcome, RandyB!
    ***************************************
    Emergency Medicine - saving the world from itself, one person at a time. Life guarding the shallow end of the gene pool. Your first stop on your last trip, and the backstop to all other medical specialites.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2
    A quick intro:

    I am a NREMT-I99 (econo paramedic, same protocols slightly less pay) in the state of Virginia currently working full time for a hospital based ambulance service. We provided ALS/BLS transport, Contract EMS, Rotor wing, Fixed wing, Peds/Neo transport, and a few other random things. I work as a 911 medic in the largest 911 division, I also do ALS transport, and have been cross trained to the Fixed wing service. I also work very part time for a large rural county (350+ square miles) with basically one staffed medic unit, I volunteer for another county and function as a preceptor. I also serve as the lead tactical medic for small SWAT team.

    I am a repeat offender in RESQDOC's training courses including multiple trips to central america and a few other trips around the world.

    I have been lurking around this forum for some time and figured I would join in . Good to see some familiar screen names and look forward to learning alot.


    MIKE G

  13. #73
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    4,708
    Welcome aboard sir. Good to have you with us.

    RR
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    2
    Howdy all,

    I'm currently a BScN student, also a part time soldier. May be going overseas in the near future.

    My interest in health care stems from the many injuries my friends and i have sustained (use to race mountain bike - the pedal kind - and managed to bugger myself up quite a bit on the tail end of a shoulder injury that happened 11months ago).
    As i progress, i would like to focus my knowledge in two areas, expedition medicine, and tactical medicine. I also have a large interest in dx skills not involving fancy equipment, which most medical professionals are so eager to rely upon.
    I've been told that one of the many things i lack is empathy, so if i seem cold, or offend you in any of my posts, im sorry, and i most likely didnt mean it.

    Cheers,
    t_a

  15. #75
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    4,708
    T A, welcome aboard. You'll find a number of discussions about throughout the forums involving basic diagnostic equipment and recommendations for same, as well as more advanced - to a point - suggestions focused on portability.

    Insofar as being "cold" that is sometimes in the eye of the beholder as well as dependant upon the situation.

    RR
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

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