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Thread: NASA - ISS Emergency Medical Manual (partial) and Med kit inventory

  1. #1
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    NASA - ISS Emergency Medical Manual (partial) and Med kit inventory

    http://www.governmentattic.org/19doc...anual_2016.pdf

    dental anesthesia illustrations are better then the special Forces manuals.

    any comments on contents and procedures?

    -t

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangent View Post
    dental anesthesia illustrations are better then the special Forces manuals.

    any comments on contents and procedures?

    -t
    Wow! Almost gives me a toothache just looking at the images. Good reference, thanks.
    Looks like they've got a good stock of drugs should they need 'em.

    -AD

  4. #4
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    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-35254508

    [...]
    The challenges of coping with serious medical emergencies are not just confined to the ISS.

    Dr Fred Papali, who works in critical care medicine at the University of Maryland, US, and has spent time working in emergency wards in hospitals in Haiti and south Sudan, says there are lessons to be learnt for many remote, rural regions on Earth.

    He sees parallels between the isolation of the ISS and some rural areas in low-income countries, where health care services are lacking.

    "In many parts of the world, basic emergency and acute medical facilities just don't exist. It's challenging because the doctors there don't have experience or training... and patients are often clinging on to life with their pinky."

    He has witnessed how hospitals with no running water and no electricity saved lives using ultrasound to make quick diagnoses in medical emergencies.

    "It's a simple and revolutionary technology which can look more deeply," he says.

    Dr Papali also says that the use of telemedicine - the remote treatment of patients by a doctor using an electronic video or audio link, which is so vital in space - should be more widespread in the developing world.

    When an internet connection is all that is needed in a remote location to dial up an experienced doctor to ask for advice or to access information, "very cheap interventions can make a difference between life and death".

    It is no real surprise that aerospace technology can benefit communities in disaster zones, in high-altitude areas, and in remote and isolated villages on terra firma.

    Their needs are very similar. Medical devices in space must be small, light, robust, smart and low in power consumption. The same is true in remote regions.

    So Nasa and the European Space Agency have made it their business to share the benefits of any innovations in aerospace technology with the wider medical and science community.

    Training people to use the technology correctly is important too. Just as Tim Peake has been trained to use medical equipment and act like a space paramedic, similar training can be given to people in areas where there are shortages of doctors and healthcare workers, for example in sub-Saharan Africa.
    [...]

    -t

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