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Thread: Austere Environment - what knots do you find you use?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Austere Environment - what knots do you find you use?

    Hi,
    I know this is a which is better, Chevrolet or Ford type of discussion. But, my opinion, it's one we should have every now and then.

    Which knots do you find you use in the field - general purpose and medical.

    Butterfly knot, Bowline, Figure-8, Square Knot (and it's brother Surgeons knot), Clove hitchand of course any "slippery" version of the above knots.

    OK - any questions about my choices? Any you think should be included?
    WolfBrother

    People you take care of never want to hear you say "Dang!!! Look at that!".

    Any/all article's posted are reproduced in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
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    Tautline and 2 Half Hitches. Both used as sliding knots to adjust tension on canopies, etc. Figure 8's make for a decent end knot to prevent a line from slipping back through. Though I have never had to pack a mule I suppose a diamond hitch would be good to know for some environments.

    My use of a clove hitch is normally going to be as a starter for a lashing project. I have not conned a canoe for years. But I do keep a couple of bales of bailing twine around just in case I want to lash together a table or a bridge.

    RR
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
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    5,166
    Just ran across this web site and thought I better toss it up for anyone interested in knot tying. An animated guide to tying dozens of knots, many which I must admit to having never heard of.

    RR

    https://www.animatedknots.com/
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
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    RR,
    It's a great site.

    What I'm doing is gathering a list of maybe 10 knots or so that ebber boty in the areas that I hang use.

    I'm going to do a step by step photo/description for each knot in a word doc. I've been asked also to do .pdf and maybe .html version.

    During my various modes ( Boy Scout, Explorer, .mil Medic, FFighter/Rescue/EMT, LE, construction worker, drilling rig roughneck ) I've found that a select few of the knots I know have been needed.

    I'm expanding my few to those who hang where I do and making them available.
    WolfBrother

    People you take care of never want to hear you say "Dang!!! Look at that!".

    Any/all article's posted are reproduced in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    5,166
    Well, it has been a few years since I have had to use it but a trucker's hitch is more than useful for tying down loads. I have been known to use a slip knot upstream from a looped line that runs back through it to create a quick-and-dirty trucker's hitch; less formal and intended for light loads only.

    Timber hitch if the need to drag logs or planks, etc might be in the future. Simple and effective.

    I am not exactly what you call surgically skilled so a simple surgeon's knot is about as complicated as I ever get on those very few occasions. I find it also works well for tying packages because the knot doesn't slip as bad while you tie your second pass over the top. Again, quick and dirty, not suggested for tying a package to be shipped via UPS.

    The clove hitch is my go-to for joining two disparate lines though it doesn't work well in my experience when you are trying to join a pair of slippery lines such as different diameters of monofilament. No 'grab' to that stuff so it WILL slip out as opposed to anything of a natural or rough fiber nature.

    I have been taught (as an adult, never as a youth) and come to regard myself as well that square knots are 'slippery' knots that should never be used when a life is on the line. I made sure my boys knew that when I was teaching them.

    BTW, one teaching method I used was to challenge them to a knot race. Of course I cheated, because I tied them behind my back while they were tying them in the front while facing and watching, and more often then not still beat them. Nothing like a little incentive.

    RR
    Knowledge shared is learning gained by both teacher and student.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    306
    Yup on the square knot not being safe for when a life is on the line.
    As a kid, I tied a loop in the end of a rope with a square knot and when it slipped, nearly got hurt.

    The definition of slippery knot I'm using is when you pull tight the knot at the end, there is a slip knot at the free end. A good pull on the free end, the loop slips thru the knot and it's undone.

    You know like when you come out of the hole, go around the tree, and go back in the hole, AND instead of pulling tight then, make a loop and bring a bit of the free end back out of the hole. That free end then become sort of a quick release. You pull it so the loop goes back thru the knot and it all falls apart.

    The bows that are created when tying our shoes do the same thing, they slip thru the knot to easily untie it.
    WolfBrother

    People you take care of never want to hear you say "Dang!!! Look at that!".

    Any/all article's posted are reproduced in accordance with Section 107 of title 17 of the Copyright Law of the United States relating to fair-use and is for the purposes of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

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